July in August

Apologies for the lack of posts…I know my last few haven’t been getting much attention (why? I don’t know?) but regardless, I WILL MOVE FORWARD because I watched Miranda July films and they are amazing. I also changed my Twitter icon to something more suitable than the neutral and weird picture of me in front of the ocean.

First, I watched “The Future” and I really liked it. It’s a lot more hidden meaning-heavy than “Me You and Everyone We Know,” which I also watched, and which is a little different in that it’s more realistic whereas “The Future” has what seems to be a lot more symbolic. The film starts off with the narrations of what at first sounds like a small small child but is actually a cat that Sophie (played by July) and Jason (Hamish Linklater) are attempting to adopt, as they rescued it.  The vet claims that the cat is in an unhealthy state but that if they care for it, it could live for five years. Sophie and Jason both realize (decide) that in five years, they’ll be in their forties, which, according to Jason, “is basically their fifties.” Each embark on their own adventures with different people in order to try to live more, but in the long run, you get the sense that it’s what kills them.

Sophie and Jason in their hipster LA apartment.

This is how the film starts out, with both of them sitting across from each other on a couch. At first, I thought their relationship was going sour but it actually starts out well, despite what the first few minutes of dialogue may tell you. I think Miranda July has a knack for making you feel like you’re watching a documentary without any narrators–you have to figure out a lot of things for yourself and because her films have been relatively short, a lot of it is up to your interpretation. If I talk more about it, I’m afraid I’ll give more away.

The second film I watched (which I guess I enjoyed more but I think it’s too early to decide) was “Me You and Everyone We Know” which is a lot more simplistic and is more of a “slice-of-life” film about a group of people living in LA whose lives get somewhat tangled. I guess I’m a sucker of realistic films about everyday people but this really is one of my favorites. It still has its indie-weird charm but it’s not overbearingly so (like in 500 Days of Summer, which, even after Joseph Gordon-Levitt’s quotation, still makes me irritated.) Miranda July isn’t the main character in this, rather one of the more supporting ones–they’re all supporting, which is what I liked about it. Nobody’s life is the center of attention because everyone’s life seems to matter to her. The cat’s life mattered more than anything in “The Future,” just as the kids’ lives matter as much as the teenage girl’s down the street. Everyone deserves to be documented, everyone seems to be significant.

This was one of my favorite scenes in the history of ever, the way they connected was one of my favorite parts.

Aesthetically speaking, there was a lot of pink. And who doesn’t like pink?? Don’t answer that.

The teenage girls were some of my favorite characters. While I always like seeing the way adults portray teenage friendships, I think that these two were definitely a weird pair but I liked them a lot because of it. They were a little competitive, which bothered me, but I guess that’s often true in friendships, sadly enough.

Carlie Westerman played Sylvie, a girl who is obsessed with cooking and house tools and speaks like a 30-year-old. I loved her character as well because a lot of kids have interests in really weird things, things that aren’t race cars or dolls and I think that it’s good it was documented (it’s probably a really deep metaphor and I’m just missing the point.)

Littletroublegrrrl, Talia (theshadowofyoursong), Riotsqurrrl, Ebertfest (old old article lol), thereeldeliansblog, Rotten tomatoes, allthingsfangirl, spfw, artbizblog.

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